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SNRE Wednesday Seminar - Shared screen with speaker view
Anne Gondor
01:10:30
How much did the NEPA process cost?
Elise Gornish, University of Arizona
01:11:29
Your response rate for your survey was fabulous - why do you think you got such a great response?
ALEJANDRO GANESH MARIN MENDEZ
01:13:15
Who controls the head of cattle each rancher could have, could you tell us more about the power relationships between the group? is a leader helpful, a very integrated group or why do you thing you had that amazing response?
allie
01:13:24
Do you plan to do any follow-up wildlife research looking at whether sage grouse populations in the area continue to improve as a result of the changes to the grazing schedule?
Jim Malusa
01:14:15
Concerning E Coli and grazing duration: why would the impacts of four-month rotation have such an early impact?
Anne Gondor
01:14:20
Thanks for the NEPA question answer
eanewman
01:14:22
The BLM is currently planning to put in 11,000 miles of fire breaks across the sagebrush ecosystems in the west. Do you have any insight into how they avoided the rigorous standards required for sage grouse protection?
Kira Leigh Hefty
01:15:34
In addition to cattle grazing, are there other non-native disturbances that might affect riparian health? Feral horses? Non-native plants (cheat grass, etc.)?
eanewman
01:15:40
(Also, thank you for this wonderful talk)
Elise Gornish, University of Arizona
01:15:44
cool, thanks!
Ron Trosper
01:16:45
Do the federal agencies appreciate the collaboration with local ranchers in seeking solutions to the issues?
ALEJANDRO GANESH MARIN MENDEZ
01:18:31
Yep, thanks. As always requires a lot of previous human dimension work. Thanks for your presentation.
allie
01:19:18
Awesome news, thank you so much for the great talk!
Miguel
01:19:28
Thanks for your presentation! Would you use this same method to find out if livestock is competing with or affecting other wildlife like native large herbivores?
Anne Gondor
01:21:29
Thanks great presentation!
Kira Leigh Hefty
01:22:08
One more question: do you work with Great Basin Institute Land Health Assessment crews or use any data that they may have collected in your area?
David Quanrud
01:22:33
Thanks Kris for your excellent presentation!
Jim Malusa
01:24:12
Jim again, on E. coli. If you look at your graph, the four month creek had high E coli shortly after the cows arrive, but not so with the 2-4 week cows. Why the difference?
ALEJANDRO GANESH MARIN MENDEZ
01:29:04
I have been working with prairie dogs in Mexico, where a similar approach with cattle management was done. Rodrigo Sierra is the guy who managed that part, I left the link of an interview when he present the approach we took and probably we can discuss it in the future. Thanks for the presentation: https://quiviracoalition.org/rodrigo-sierra-corona/
Jim Malusa
01:30:45
Thanks a million!
Miguel
01:31:14
Thanks for your answer, great presentation!
David F Gori
01:31:16
Thanks for the great presentation!
Coral Gardner
01:31:18
How many cattle will be grazing at a time with the new system?
Manoj Bhusal
01:31:32
thank you for your excellent presentation
Kira Leigh Hefty
01:31:34
Thanks! Not sure GBI has crews where you are right now, but they are generally hired by the BLM to collect landscape-level data on rangelands. Their central office is in Reno, NV, but they have crews in several states now. Their data collection standards are developed by the Jornada Research Institute.
Coral Gardner
01:32:02
Thank you! Great Presentation. I am from Utah and heard about this 2 years ago. Super excited.
Deandra Jones
01:32:02
Thank you for the presentation!
Vicki Greer
01:32:02
Thanks for the presentation, I hope the impletation goes well, cooperation is always a good thing! :)